Links 18-04-01
Apr 1, 2018
2 minute read

Dev

  • 6 creative ways to solve problems with Linux containers and Docker – Tools have become such a big focus today that there are many people who haven’t spent much time thinking about all the ways containers alone can provide interesting solutions to problems. In this post, Sean Kane takes you on an outside-the-box exploration of how containers can be used to provide novel solutions.

  • The modern frontend developer in 2018 – Kamran Ahmed, currently lead engineer at tajawal, has worn a lot of hats throughout his career and has answered a lot of questions. To save himself the hassle of answering these questions time and time again—and to help others—he’s prepared a roadmap to becoming a frontend developer. Plus, he’s working on backend and DevOps, too.

  • A graphical user interface to build apps on top of microservicesa – Andy Oram, O’Reilly, writes about how to enable non-programmer business users to create their own data applications.

Ops

  • Use the power of CloudFlare’s network to host your site using Nginx.

  • Solution Deep Dive – Building a Highly Available Web Application with Web Processing and Storing Capabilities Using MongoDB and Elk Stack.

  • SSH Permit A38 – tool that lets you centralize the management and deployment of SSH keys in your infrastructure.

  • Setting up an SSH CA – since moving to Kubernetes, logging into a server may have become less common, but when things go really wrong, you just need a shell, and in a hurry. Even while embracing automation to manage cloud-based servers, the problem of managing SSH access has never gone away. Phil Taprogge, IT Ops Times, dives into the nightmare of synchronizing files and other ways of tackling SSH CA.

Misc

  • Summer reading: CS books – As you head into summer perhaps with the intention of taking time to learn something new, you’ll want to browse this Reddit list of suggestions for CS-related summer reading, both fiction and nonfiction.

  • Porting Prince of Persia to the BBC Master – the author of the original 1980s game, Jordan Mechner, found and posted the source code to the Apple II version. These fine folks ported it to a different 1980s computer. I love the creativity of people who hack on small retro systems. I find big web stuff lacks that these days: it’s all up-to-your-elbows in frameworks.

  • Sarcastic web services and websites that actually exist – a list of hilarious web services, web sites, and libraries.



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